Newton Would Choose Real Science Over Political Agendas

Travelers have plenty of chances to learn about how, over the centuries, science has contributed mightily to our world. And even today, when facts are optional for many Americans, science will ultimately prevail. In this clip from the first season of my television show (way back in 1990), I visited Cambridge‘s Trinity College, where Sir Isaac Newton spent 30 years. It was here that Newton measured the speed of sound by clapping his hands and timing the echo as it raced down the side of a cloister and back.

Newton Would Choose Real Science Over Political Agendas

March for Science! Travelers have plenty of chances to learn about how, over the centuries, science has contributed mightily to our world. And even today, when facts are optional for many Americans, science will ultimately prevail. In this clip from the first season of my television show (way back in 1990), I visited Cambridge's Trinity College, where Sir Isaac Newton spent 30 years. It was here that Newton measured the speed of sound by clapping his hands and timing the echo as it raced down the side of a cloister and back. Tomorrow, I will stand in solidarity with all those who are coming together to March for Science. The insatiable curiosity of scientists has made our world a brighter place — and our future depends on us all supporting the continual process of discovery. Please join me in thanking scientists everywhere…and committing ourselves to demand real facts when it comes to policy making in our government.

Posted by Rick Steves on Friday, April 21, 2017

 

Tomorrow, I will stand in solidarity with all those who are coming together to March for Science. The insatiable curiosity of scientists has made our world a brighter place — and our future depends on us all supporting the continual process of discovery. Please join me in thanking scientists everywhere…and committing ourselves to demand real facts when it comes to policy making in our government.

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